2015 Partners & Sponsors

    PRESERVATION CIRCLE   Iron Mountain Entertainment Services For more than 60 years, Iron Mountain has preserved priceless originals […]

Interview: Sayeed Choudhury

Interview: Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury discusses his DAS: New York presentation on the Johns Hopkins Digital Preservation Repositories for Research and Science. Interviewed at AMIA's DAS: New York on May 8, 2015 by Snowden Becker, UCLA Moving Image Archiving Studies.

DAS New York: Sayeed Choudhury

Johns Hopkins Digital Preservation Repositories for Research and Science

Johns Hopkins Digital Preservation Repositories for Research and Science. The Sheridan Libraries at Johns Hopkins University have been storing and archiving research data for over a decade and have recently developed a data archive through initial funding from the National Science Foundation. Through work with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the development of the Data Conservancy, the Sheridan Libraries have developed a conceptual model for data management, a definition of preservation inspired by the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model and a set of lessons learned. The presentation describes the history of this data curation work and its culmination through the development of the JHU data archive. Additionally, the talk will feature challenges or opportunities related to data management that span different types of data from a diverse array of communities or organizations. Sayeed Choudhury is Associate Dean for Research Data Management, Johns Hopkins University and Hodson Director, Digital Research and Curation Center, Johns Hopkins University. Presented May 8, 2015 at AMIA's DAS: New York.

An Interview with Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury discusses his DAS: New York presentation on the Johns Hopkins Digital Preservation Repositories for Research and Science. Interviewed at AMIA's DAS: New York on May 8, 2015 by Snowden Becker, UCLA Moving Image Archiving Studies.

DAS New York: Tanya Clement

HiPSTAS NEH R&D Project: Automated Extraction of Metadata From Large Collections.

For over a decade organizations with legacy audio holdings have placed their resources and focus on digitization. Despite the fact that hundreds of thousands of hours have been digitized, searching through audio content has been constrained largely to text-based description, greatly restricting discovery. To address this reality, the High Performance Sound Technologies for Analysis and Scholarship (HiPSTAS) project is working on applying advanced computational techniques, such as spectral analysis and machine learning, to expand opportunities for discovery and research insights across audio collections. The presentation explores first results of the HiPSTAS project when applied to two bodies of materials. The first is the University of Texas Folklore Center Archives, containing collections from John and Alan Lomax, in which HiPSTAS enables discovery based on genre. The second is PennSound, containing poetry read by Allen Ginsberg, Robert Creeley, Cecilia Vicuña, and many others, in which HiPSTAS enables discovery based on dates, speaker, and venue. Tanya Clement is an Assistant Professor in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. Presented at DAS: New York on May 8, 2015.

An Interview with Tanya Clement

Tanya Clement discusses her DAS: New York presentation on the HiPSTAS NEH R&D Project. Interviewed at AMIA's DAS: New York on May 8, 2015 by Snowden Becker, UCLA Moving Image Archiving Studies.

Interview: Tanya Clement

An Interview with Tanya Clement

Tanya Clement discusses her DAS: New York presentation on the HiPSTAS NEH R&D Project. Interviewed at AMIA's DAS: New York on May 8, 2015 by Snowden Becker, UCLA Moving Image Archiving Studies.

Interview: Ben Fino-Radin

Interview: Ben-Fino Radin

Ben Fino-Radin discusses his DAS: New York presentation on MoMA's Digital Repository for Museum Collections. Interviewed at AMIA's DAS: New York on May 8, 2015 by Snowden Becker, UCLA Moving Image Archiving Studies.

DAS New York: Ben Fino-Radin

MoMA Digital Repository for Museum Collections

MoMA Digital Repository for Museum Collections . The Museum of Modern Art’s department of conservation has built the first digital repository management software tailored to meet the needs and requirements of museum collections. This new free and open source software facilitates digital collections care, management, preservation, and access for time-based media and born-digital artworks – with a particular focus on moving image material. The case study shares a holistic view of how MoMA has implemented this software to meet the challenges of managing a collection that includes thousands of heterogeneous media assets, projected to grow to the petabyte scale over the course of the next three years. Ben Fino-Radin serves as Digital Repository Manager in the department of conservation, and also serves as an Adjunct Professor in NYU’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation program. Presented at DAS New York on May 8, 2015

An Interview with Ben Fino-Radin

UCLA's Snowden Becker interviews Ben about his DAS presentation and his work at MoMA.

DAS New York Schedule

Preliminary Schedule Please note: Schedule is subject to change 8:30am Doors Open 9:00am Welcome 9:15am MoMA Digital Repository for Museum […]

DAS New York: Program

The Forensic Audio, Video and Image Analysis Unit: Overview & Digital Image/Video Authentication The Forensic Audio, Video, and Image Analysis […]

2015 Speakers

Walter E. Bruehs is employed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation as the Supervisory Photographic Technologist in the Forensic Audio, […]